Pine Trees and Dandelions

Pine Trees and Dandelions

"While I was ill I nevertheless still did a few small canvases from memory which you’ll see later, reminiscences of the north, and now I’ve just finished a sunlit corner of a meadow which I think is fairly vigorous. You’ll see it soon. As Mr Peyron is away I haven’t yet read your letters, but I know that some have come. He has been quite kind in informing you of the situation, as for me I don’t know what to do or think. But I have a great desire to leave this place. That won’t surprise you, I don’t need to tell you any more about it. Letters have also come from home, which I haven’t yet had the courage to read, so melancholy do I feel. Please ask Mr Aurier not to write any more articles about my painting, tell him earnestly that first he is wrong about me, then that really I feel too damaged by grief to be able to face up to publicity. Making paintings distracts me – but if I hear talk of them that pains me more than he knows." To Theo. Saint-Rémy-de-Provence, Tuesday, 29 April 1890
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Details:
Painting Date
29th of April 1890
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Description:

Vincent has painted this piece in his final weeks of stay in the asylum at Saint Remy in Provence.  He is in the final stages of recovery after a two month attack during which he has felt unable to work.  He has read his first glowing critical review out of Paris by a critic and friend of Emile Bernards – Albert Aurier.  This is Vincent’s first uncomfortable dance with potential fame and recognition for the path he has chosen and forged beyond impressionism.  He is uncomfortable with the words spoken and think them too much to be heaped upon his efforts.

Sketch in Related Images is from a letter written to Theo in May of 1890, after he has created the painting.

“While I was ill I nevertheless still did a few small canvases from memory which you’ll see later, reminiscences of the north, and now I’ve just finished a sunlit corner of a meadow which I think is fairly vigorous. You’ll see it soon.  As Mr Peyron is away I haven’t yet read your letters, but I know that some have come. He has been quite kind in informing you of the situation, as for me I don’t know what to do or think. But I have a great desire to leave this place. That won’t surprise you, I don’t need to tell you any more about it.   Letters have also come from home, which I haven’t yet had the courage to read, so melancholy do I feel.

Please ask Mr Aurier not to write any more articles about my painting, tell him earnestly that first he is wrong about me, then that really I feel too damaged by grief to be able to face up to publicity. Making paintings distracts me – but if I hear talk of them that pains me more than he knows.”

To Theo. Saint-Rémy-de-Provence, Tuesday, 29 April 1890

Painting, Oil on Canvas – 72 x 90 cm Size 30 Figure
Saint-Rémy: April , 1890
Kröller-Müller Museum
Otterlo, The Netherlands, Europe
F: 676, JH: 1970

Where Vincent Was:
Saint Remy

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