Still Life with French Novels and a Rose

Still Life with French Novels and a Rose

"For my part I must also wish you a happy birthday— since I’d like to give you something of my work that you’ll like I’ll set aside a little study of a book and a flower for you — in a large format with a whole mass of books with pink, yellow, green covers and fiery red — my painting Parisian novels was the same subject. Theo will bring this for you..." Vincent To sister Wil
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Painting Date
15th of October 1887
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Notes from Musee d’ Orsay – Van Gogh A Paris – rough translation, need to edit:

The translation of the passage from a letter to his sister (written in Hindu, 5-9) “Seven Romans Parisiens,” unfortunately erroneous, gave rise to the impression that the aruste mentioned the number of romajns depicted in its still life: in fact, the correct translation is “my Parisian romance painting.” Van Gogh has an abbreviation for? Intuitively, in his letters to the painter Anthon van Rappard (R 30, 51, 35, 46, 48), I thank Jan Hulsker for his (For a reproduction in color), fig 29 (for a drawing of the library and the An office with books, but no staff at the Metropolitan Museum in New York.) The painting Edmond Irant remained in the college of Degas, (Lemoisne- vol. No. 517.) 4. G ^ Kahn, The Independent Review. 1888, p. 165. The canvas was numbered 658 in the catalog of the Independents of 1888. 5. The artist (Hartrick, p. 46) first stated that in this painting, van Gogh is used to delineate the texture of 6. These commentaries (LT555) reinforce the opinion that has sometimes been advanced, according to which the vrrere vreion of the still life of Parisian Romcins (F55S) could in fact be a copy executed from memory by Vincent at Arles, in the style practiced at that time, was exhibited under this title at the Erpwutiande, the Society of Independent Artists, in the spring of 1888. In a letter to Tiico (LT4 <i8), B clearly appears that it is The latter who had proposed to present it to the Independents, together with the two landscapes (Cat No. 51 and No. 52), was chosen by Vincent, but that it was the painter who attributed his work to him. In fact, is the subtitle of the novel by Jean Richepin Braves, published in 1886 and already re-enacted by van Gog H in his painting Nature nwrte with three books (cat n * ^). Although in Paris novels, the titles are not legible on any of the books represented, van Gogh certainly made his choice: on French naturaBst authors; He quotes six of these authors in the first of his letters to his sister WUlemina who have come to us and recommends his reading, giving his opinion: “The work of the Frenchmen is magnificent, It is very difficult to say that one really belongs to one’s own time if one is not aware of it. ” Later, in another letter to Wmemina (“T5), he wrote about Zola and Maupassant:” Today’s art wants absolutely something very rich, something very joyous, and that ” The same tendency begins to become the rule in painting. ” There can be no doubt, therefore, that in his homage to the Parisian novels of the French naturalist, van Gogh tried to arrive at something “very rich and very joyous” comparable to what he admired in his favorite readings. He paints, by way of signature, a glass with roses: this flower, which appears in the emblem of the van Gogh fanoue, pays homage yet more moving. By his subject, Romans Parisian does not belong to any of the great trends of the pemture in France, realistic or impressionist. However, the portrait of Degas in his brilliant colors in 1879 by the realistic novelist and art critic Edmond Dwrcuity (Glasgow, Art Gallery and Museum, BG. A) certainly attracted a special interest in Vincent, especially If he knew the interpretation of J.-il Huysmans, who saw in it a proof of the admiration of Degas for Delacroix. By style, Ronums Parisian is even more unique, even in the work of van Gogh. The critic Gustavus Kahn, as usual, did the work of Depas, Edmond Durunty (IS79). Glasgow. .Vrt Gallers and Mu & euin. V. GOGTI IN PARIS

 

‘Gogh proved his perspicacity when he described the picture in the following terms: “To a sprawling tapestry a polychrome multitude of books,” he added, however, this negative remark: “This motive, good for study, can not be a pretext for pictures. The tapestry effect noted by G. Rahn found its main source in Japanese art, particularly in the color prints, on crepe, which van Gogh collected (fig. B) and whose ragged surface he incorporated into his own Pictorial language5. As for the bill, there are still many hatchings, typical of the paintings of the last months of 1887, and the use of rich colors, often grouped, according to the habit of the painter, By contrasts of “complementary”. Let us note that he made the acquaintance of Guillaumin, led to the apartment of the van Gogh by Portier, while he worked on this canvas. When, later in Arles, van Gogh worked on the first version of Vincent’s room at Arles (F 482, Amsterdam, Rijksmuseum Vincent van Gogh), he would advocate the “more simple and more simple” “This bedroom is something like this still life of the Parisian novels.” 6 This shows that, subsequently, van Gogh did not have to Not consider the Parisian period as useless for his work of the moment. Instead, he saw it as the necessary basis from which his personal style could evolve ever further. VAN GOGH ITEM

 

“For my part I must also wish you a happy birthday— since I’d like to give you something of my work that you’ll like I’ll set aside a little study of a book and a flower for you — in a large format with a whole mass of books with pink, yellow, green covers and fiery red — my painting Parisian novels was the same subject. Theo will bring this for you…”

Vincent To sister Willemien van Gogh. from Arles, on or about Friday, 30 March 1888.

 

Autumn, 1887

Painting, Oil on Canvas Paris: Autumn, 1887

The Robert Holmes Court Gallery Perth,

Western Australia, Australia, Australia

F: 359, JH: 1332

Where Vincent Was:
Paris

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